Jul 072019
 

Human Allocation of Space, 2019. Bronze, 50 x 68 x 25 cm, edition of 5

A new sculpture which debuted at my Artist+AI: Figures and Form exhibition. This bronze (as with all works in the show), was created in collaboration with AI tools that I’ve trained as my ‘art assistants’, in this instance one that translates my drawings into three-dimensional form.

Effectively I created this piece by drawing a ‘blueprint’ which directs the AI to build volume, planes and edges in a certain way (based on the way that I originally trained the network, which is a sort of alchemy itself). Below you can see a side-by-side comparison of the ‘blueprint’ and the final sculpture. More on the process of creating the final bronze coming in a future post.

ai generated sculpture from Scott Eaton's drawing - blueprint for Human Allocation of Spacecomparison of ‘Blueprint’ and resulting bronze

Jun 192019
 

Scott Eaton's Humanity (Fall of the Damned), 210 x 165 cm, archival print on aluminiumHumanity (Fall of the Damned), 210 x 165 cm, archival print on aluminium

Hand drawn, painted using my Bodies neural network. One of the center pieces of my exhibition, “Artist+AI: Figures and Form” at Somerset House in June, 2019.

drawing for Scott Eaton's Fall of the DamnedDrawing for Humanity (Fall of the Damned), 110 x 85 cm, archival print on aluminium

Jun 112019
 

Invitation to Scott Eaton's Artist plus AI: Figures and Form exhibitionclick for larger

EXHIBITION OF WORK
19-23 June, 2019
10-5:30pm daily
Somerset House, New Wing, room G16

My new exhibition showcasing work created in ‘collaboration’ with AI is running from the 19-23rd of June at Somerset House in London. It is a free, but ticketed event, so you will need to book in advance. Please get your tickets HERE.

“This exhibition showcases the recent work of artist Scott Eaton combining the latest in generative artificial intelligence (AI) with the centuries old practices of drawing and sculpture. The show’s featured works are the result of the dynamic interaction between Scott’s traditionally-trained hand and the AI tools he has ‘taught’ to work as his assistants. In this show, Eaton, an interdisciplinary artist with backgrounds in sculpture, anatomy and design, underscores the impact AI is set to have on the art-making process.”

May 242019
 

Scott Eaton's anatomy and digital sculpture coursesclick for larger

SUMMER SESSIONS

Enrollment is now open for the Summer sessions of my anatomy and digital figure sculpting courses starting in June/July 2019. These in-depth courses are designed to teach the skills every figurative artist needs to produce inspiring, professional level work. The courses have been taught to artists and studios around the world, including Pixar, Industrial Light & Magic, Disney, Sony, Warner Bros, Ubisoft, Blizzard, EA and many others. If you are looking for an intensive course to level up your figurative art skills, consider one of these:
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Apr 122019
 

Artist+AI: Scott Eaton Lens Series 1Drawing plus AI – created using a bespoke neural network trained on my figure photography

I’ve just recorded and uploaded an extended version of my recent Creative AI talk. This talk summarises the last two years of my exploration into combining AI with my interests in photography, drawing and sculpture. The talk gives a good synopsis of the amazing creative potential of these tools. This is the first time I’ve shared the work in public, as I now feel it is mature enough that I am comfortable showing the results of my explorations. There are many more experiments and works-in-progress to be shared in the coming weeks and months, and of course mark 18-23 June in your calendar for a visit to my exhibition of this work at Somerset House, London (admission is free).

Please find the lecture here:

Nov 022018
 

Scott Eaton's Essential Anatomy Masterclass, with Framestore artistsIntro showing some of the studios I’ve taught over the years

I’ve just finished an intensive, one-day Essential Anatomy session with the talented artists from Framestore, London. Sixty artists and I convened in the Somerset House screening room for a day covering critical lessons from both human and comparative anatomy. I don’t often run anatomy courses this short (most are a minimum of two days), so it was a challenge to distill the essential lessons from many years of teaching anatomy into a format the could deliver the maximum amount of useful information in a single day course.

In class ecorche studies - Scott Eaton's Essential Anatomyin-course anatomy studies over old master drawings
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May 242018
 

Homo naledi reconstruction, v2

A producer friend recently asked if I had time to put together a quick sculpt for a pitch he was giving to a potential client. The request was for a concept of what the extinct homonid species Homo naledi would have looked like in life. I happened to have a relatively free day and was excited to do some digital sculpting so I said I would give it a try.

First, who or what were Homo naledi? It turn out they are fairly recent relatives of modern humans (ca. 250,000 year ago) – discovered in 2013, to great acclaim, by a pair of cavers fumbling around in a South African cave system. The species appears to be a interesting mix of human and primate characteristics – hands and feet very near our own but with shoulders and pelvises closer to our primate ancestors. We know they were short of stature, possibly standing barely five feet tall, and had small skulls exhibiting primitive features including reduced cranial capacity (half of a modern human), robust orbital tori, reduced/absent chin, but with small teeth and gentle canines.

Taking these few data points and a handful of images of the incomplete skulls of homo Naledi, I put together a couple versions. The first, below, pushes the facial characteristics more towards primate, but with the spark of intelligence one would expect of the genus Homo. The second, and my preferred version (above), leans toward a more human interpretation of facial characteristics. It includes a quick torso study for context and posture, as well as what I imagine to be a mass of matted, dirty hair. A timelapse of the sculpting process coming soon.

Homo Naledi portrait study, v1

Mar 022018
 

digital portrait study - Pavel, by Scott Eaton, Zbrush

A portrait study from last Friday. I have been seeing so many interesting faces on the street lately it has inspired me to start working through a new series of portraits. Of course I am also outlining the content for my upcoming Digital Portrait Sculpting course, so faces are on my mind right now. There are a couple of higher resolution images below.
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