Oct 032017
 

Houdon Ecorche Sculpture 2.0 - Desktop anatomy reference

The Eaton-Houdon Ecorche is a contemporary anatomy figure based on the classic L’Écorché, the 18th century anatomy study by French neoclassical sculptor Jean-Antoine Houdon. The original écorché figure was used for centuries in art academies and ateliers around the world to teach students anatomy and cast drawing.

Multiple views of the Houdon Ecorche v2
This version, produced in collaboration with Michael Defeo, corrects a handful of lingering anatomical mistakes while retaining the gesture, pose, and naturalism that made the original a favorite of mine and of other artists through the centuries. Here it is produced at eighteen inches, an ideal size for desktop reference and study. Each figure is hand cast in museum-quality resin with removable magnetic arms.

Available at: EATON.london

 

Desktop Anatomy figure - Eaton Houdon Ecorcheclick for larger

Oct 022017
 

online courses for anatomy and figure sculpture with Scott Eatonclick for larger

Enrolment is open for the Winter sessions of my renowned anatomy and digital sculpting courses. If you are looking for an intensive course to level up your figurative art skills going into 2018, consider one of these:

  • ANATOMY FOR ARTISTS
    The most comprehensive online course covering artistic anatomy. No prerequisites are necessary, just a sincere interest in learning about the wonderful machine that is the human body! more…
  • DIGITAL FIGURE SCULPTURE
    An intense ten-week course in the tools and techniques of digital figure sculpture. This course is recommended for students with a firm grounding in anatomy (the Anatomy for Artists course is recommended) as well as an intermediate knowledge of ZBrush. more…
  • PORTRAITURE & FACIAL ANATOMY
    The companion course to Anatomy for Artists, this course explore the anatomy of the face in-depth. It covers the construction of the skull, features, facial fat, musculature, expressions, and the Facial Action Coding system (FACS). Every great figure needs a great face, this course teaches you the anatomy you need to build it. more…
  • Jul 272017
     

    Ballet dancer in green dress 2click for larger

    After a busy start to the summer, I am finding time to develop sequences from our most recent Bodies in Motion photoshoot (BiM VI). Here are a few of the first images. I am falling in love with the flow of fabric and the shapes it makes when directed by graceful movement. Sequences going up soon at www.bodiesinmotion.photo

    Ballet dancer in green dress

    Ballerina photography at Bodies in Motion

    Jan 042017
     

    ecorche anatomy drawing of a flying kick from the Bodies in Motion library. more info at BodiesinMotion.photoclick for larger

    Anatomy study from Bodies in Motion.

    The Summer session of my Anatomy for Artists online course is coming up on June 23rd. In this course I cover ALL the anatomy that goes into making an ecorche drawing like the one above. In fact, ecorche drawings are the primary exercises for the eight week course and by the end you will almost certainly have levelled-up enough to create a detailed ecorche study like this one. If you have an interest in improving as a figurative artist, join me for an intense but fun 8 weeks of sutdy this summer!

    Dec 092016
     

    Demo sculpts from my Facial Anatomy workshop at Blizzard and UnbisoftThe growing collection of demo sculpts

    I’m recently back to London after a long trip to the West Coast (LA, San Francisco). The first stop was Blizzard Entertainment for a four-day facial anatomy workshop. For the uninitiated Blizzard is the juggernaut game developer behind the hit franchises World of Warcraft (WoW), Overwatch, and Starcraft. From their fortress-like campus 100 miles south of LA in Irvine, CA, they run a digital empire built on monsters, magic, and well… fun.

    Sculpture in the Blizzard Atrium dark magic at work here, me thinks a levitation spell or something

    My job was to level up the artists’ facial anatomy and portrait sculpting skills. The workshop broke down into two days of facial anatomy lecture and two days of portrait sculpting in ZBrush. The content will sound familiar to anyone who actually reads the posts on this website (and doesn’t just looking at the pictures, like most), because I ran a similar workshop for Ubisoft very recently. In fact, you’ll recognize one of the heads rendered above. I added a second head (my Blizzard demo sculpt) to the menagerie this time.

    Sculpting facial expressions in ZBrush during Scott Eaton's Facial Anatomy workshop sculpting expressions

    Even though we were studying facial anatomy the artists also got a chance to draw and study from the Bodies in Motion site. We drew from quite a few Motions, less for full-body poses but more for examples of skull structure and head/neck articulation and anatomy in dynamic poses. There were some great drawings from the room full of talented artists.

    Drawing from Bodies in Motion, head and neck studieshead studies from Bodies in Motion

    Continue reading »

    Nov 072016
     

    Digital Portrait Sculpting - Scott Eaton at Ubisoft Quebecdemo sculpt from the Ubisoft workshop

    I am recently back from a week-long workshop at Ubisoft’s Quebec studio focused on portraiture and facial anatomy. The week broke down into three days of facial anatomy lecture for twenty of their artists (animators, riggers, concept artist, character artists) and then finished with an intensive two-day portrait sculpting session in ZBrush with just the character artists.

    Scott teaching facial anatomy and portrait sculpting at Ubisoftartists sculpting away, and me, the shadowy figure in the corner
    Continue reading »

    Sep 222016
     

    30 second poses from Scott Eaton's Bodies in Motion30 second sequences from BiM

    Not long ago, I had twelve artists from Natural Motion (of Morpheme and Clumsy Ninja fame) into Somerset House, my home away from home, for a four day anatomy workshop. At the end of each day we would take about 20 minutes to draw from the Bodies in Motion library.

    drawing study with Natural Motion.sketching from BiM

    We made extensive use of the timer for gesture drawing. It can be set to 10fps, 1fps, 30sec, 1min, 2min, or 5mins, and ticks down to zero before flipping to the next frame of the motion sequence. We had it set at 30 seconds per image and we were all drawing frantically trying to keep up. Anyone who goes to life drawing regularly knows this is challenging, but it’s great practice to help capture the essence of a pose – balance, gesture, rough volumes – quickly, without being drawn into the details. Here’s a timelapse of my scribbles (Procreate on Ipad Pro):


    timelapse of a sequence of 30 second poses