Nov 242021
 

link to gallery

For the last couple of years, I have been fortunate to be curated in Nvidia’s AI Art Gallery. There are a couple of recent works featured there (which are already familiar to anyone who has explored this site) but each has additional background and context. You can also find a couple of recorded discussions I’ve had with other amazing artists creating in this space. These are available for viewing at the bottom of the gallery page (link here).

Nov 042021
 

Scott Eaton's upcoming online anatomy and figure sculpture coursesclick for larger

WINTER SESSIONS

Registration is now open for the Winter sessions of my anatomy and figure sculpting courses. These in-depth courses are designed to teach the skills every figurative artist needs to produce inspiring, professional work. The courses have been taught to artists and studios around the world, including Pixar, Industrial Light & Magic, Disney Feature Animation, Sony, Warner Bros, Ubisoft, Blizzard, EA and many others. If you are looking for an intensive course to level up your figurative art skills, consider one of these:
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Feb 162020
 

respawn reception logoRespawn reception on Valentine’s day

Pathfinder, from Apex LegendsI’ve recently returned to soggy London from ever-sunny (but windy) Los Angeles where I ran an intensive facial anatomy course for the artists at Respawn Entertainment (an EA studio). For those who don’t know their work, their freshman release was an epic mech game called Titanfall, followed by its sequel. Then in 2019 they release two huge titles – the run-away hit Apex Legends, a Fortnight styled battle royale game, and Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order, an, umm, Star Wars game.
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Dec 132019
 

Oxford University campusThe spires of Oxford

I’m just back from a trip to Oxford where I gave an afternoon seminar on my explorations with art and machine learning to an amazing group of researchers and distinguished professors at Oxford University. The talk reviewed the last three years of my artistic experimentation using machine learning (AI) as a creative tool for art making and showcased an eclectic range of successes and failures. I’ve been sharing some of the work here, but mostly finished pieces, so it was nice to dust off some of my earlier, formative experiments from the recesses of my hard drive. I’ll try to start uploading more of these here in the coming months. Even though they’re unfinished, they were important developmental milestones and each succeeded/failed in interesting, instructive ways. Stay tuned…

Special thanks to Prof. Alexei Efros for arranging the visit. It was great to chat ML, tech and art with a group of super-smart computer scientists, engineers, and thinkers.

crisp winter day in Oxford

Oct 082019
 

Scott Eaton giving creative AI lecture MaltaStill from ‘Entangled II’

I was privileged to be invited to speak again at the THU conference in Malta, this time on the main stage talking about my explorations using machine learning (AI) as a ‘creative collaborator’ in my artistic process. The talk, weighing in at a hefty 75 minutes, explored the genesis of this body of work, my early steps (and missteps) in this emerging medium, and how I’ve started integrating it into my artistic practice.

Scott Eaton Figures & Form AI lectureHyperbolic Composition I with drawing underlaid (left)

The talk included a behind-the-scenes look at the inspiration, production and labour that went into the pieces for the Artist+AI: Figures and Form exhibition. I was also excited to show, for the first time, a number of my fun, early experiments that compelled me to dig deeper into the potential of these new tools.

Scott with mind map planning the Figures & Form exhibitionAI musings from a sketchbook
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Sep 252019
 

I’ve recently returned from a fun couple of days running an Essential Anatomy masterclass for the talented artists at SUPERCELL in beautiful Helsinki, Finland. Readers might know SUPERCELL as the genius developers behind hit mobile games Clash of the Clans, Boom Beach, Clash Royale, and Brawl Stars. They have a reputation for expressive, cartoony character designs, so why the big interest in anatomy? Well, every figurative artists, even cartoonists, needs to drill down into the fundamentals of anatomy in order to build a foundation solid enough that they can stylise and abstract the human figure in a compelling, ‘believable’ way. Continue reading »