Sep 032019
 

probably best to go fullscreen

For anyone who wasn’t able to attend my “Artist+AI: Figure and Form” exhibition at Somerset House in London (uhh, most of the world), please feel free to browse the show archive above. Much (but not all) of the work is documented in various places on this site, but it is nice to see it here, shown at scale and in context. Also the exhibition text is informative and worth reading to understand a bit more about the processes used to create this body of work.

Special thanks to Lenovo, Nvidia, Panavision, Direct Digital, and Raw Umber Studios for their support. Credit to AVM and Rupert Harris for their 3d archiving services.

Aug 172019
 

Caffeinated Diversions on display at Scott Eaton's Artist+AI exhibition at Somerset HouseCaffeinated Diversions, 50x archival prints, 21x15cm

People who know me know that drawing in essential to my creative process. Over the last couple years I have been using part of my morning drawing time (yes, with a coffee… or two, or three), to create input drawings to test my Bodies neural network, which I trained on a portion of my BodiesinMotion.photo library.

Caffeinated Diversions close upclick for larger

The idea behind this “AI tool” is that I train it to learn the correspondence between my drawing style and photographic representations of the human figure, in this case photography carefully lit and shot by me in the studio. Then, once trained, I can use it to dynamically ‘paint’ my drawings in the style of my photography. It is a wonderous interaction, and there is a magical space where I can draw very stylized or abstracted figures and the neural network infers some very interesting anatomical results, always beautifully lit and shaded. The images here are from my wall of Caffeinated Diversions, fifty of the most interesting results from these morning experiments. The grey line drawings are my hand-drawn inputs, the coloured images the output of my Bodies network.

Wall of AI augmented drawings by Scott Eatonclick for larger

Beyond just the final images though, a large part of the magic that has captivated me when developing and using these AI tools is seeing the final image emerge as I draw it. Here is compilation of timelapses from these drawing sessions:

Jul 072019
 

Human Allocation of Space, 2019. Bronze, 50 x 68 x 25 cm, edition of 5

A new sculpture which debuted at my Artist+AI: Figures and Form exhibition. This bronze (as with all works in the show), was created in collaboration with AI tools that I’ve trained as my ‘art assistants’, in this instance one that translates my drawings into three-dimensional form.

Effectively I created this piece by drawing a ‘blueprint’ which directs the AI to build volume, planes and edges in a certain way (based on the way that I originally trained the network, which is a sort of alchemy itself). Below you can see a side-by-side comparison of the ‘blueprint’ and the final sculpture. More on the process of creating the final bronze coming in a future post.

ai generated sculpture from Scott Eaton's drawing - blueprint for Human Allocation of Spacecomparison of ‘Blueprint’ and resulting bronze

Jun 192019
 

Humanity (Fall of the Damned), Artist+AI, Scott Eaton 2019Humanity (Fall of the Damned), 210 x 165 cm, archival print on aluminium, edition of 3

Hand drawn, painted using my Bodies neural network. One of the center pieces at my “Artist+AI: Figures and Form” exhibition at Somerset House in June 2019.

Scott Eaton's Humanity (Fall of the Damned), 210 x 165 cm, archival print on aluminiumclick for larger

drawing for Scott Eaton's Fall of the Damnedclick for larger

Jun 112019
 

Invitation to Scott Eaton's Artist plus AI: Figures and Form exhibitionclick for larger

EXHIBITION OF WORK
19-23 June, 2019
10-5:30pm daily
Somerset House, New Wing, room G16

My new exhibition showcasing work created in ‘collaboration’ with AI is running from the 19-23rd of June at Somerset House in London. It is a free, but ticketed event, so you will need to book in advance. Please get your tickets HERE.

“This exhibition showcases the recent work of artist Scott Eaton combining the latest in generative artificial intelligence (AI) with the centuries old practices of drawing and sculpture. The show’s featured works are the result of the dynamic interaction between Scott’s traditionally-trained hand and the AI tools he has ‘taught’ to work as his assistants. In this show, Eaton, an interdisciplinary artist with backgrounds in sculpture, anatomy and design, underscores the impact AI is set to have on the art-making process.”