Apr 182019
 

Eaton MvsM Valentine's Selfie Digital Portrait SculptureScott Eaton / ManvsMachine

Personally I’m not one for selfies but this was a fun little project I sculpted recently for the designers at ManVsMachine. Their client thought a bronze (though it ended more like copper) ‘couple selfie’ would be a cute, tongue-in-cheek Valentine’s day ad. It had to be realistic but read as funny. Getting down to the sculpting, it was actually an interesting exercise in pushing the facial expressions (especially the lips) to borderline caricature, but keeping the portraits grounded in a sort of sculptural realism. My favourite part – them smashing their cheeks together – cartoony but suits the vain couple nicely.

May 242018
 

Homo naledi reconstruction, v2

A producer friend recently asked if I had time to put together a quick sculpt for a pitch he was giving to a potential client. The request was for a concept of what the extinct homonid species Homo naledi would have looked like in life. I happened to have a relatively free day and was excited to do some digital sculpting so I said I would give it a try.

First, who or what were Homo naledi? It turn out they are fairly recent relatives of modern humans (ca. 250,000 year ago) – discovered in 2013, to great acclaim, by a pair of cavers fumbling around in a South African cave system. The species appears to be a interesting mix of human and primate characteristics – hands and feet very near our own but with shoulders and pelvises closer to our primate ancestors. We know they were short of stature, possibly standing barely five feet tall, and had small skulls exhibiting primitive features including reduced cranial capacity (half of a modern human), robust orbital tori, reduced/absent chin, but with small teeth and gentle canines.

Taking these few data points and a handful of images of the incomplete skulls of homo Naledi, I put together a couple versions. The first, below, pushes the facial characteristics more towards primate, but with the spark of intelligence one would expect of the genus Homo. The second, and my preferred version (above), leans toward a more human interpretation of facial characteristics. It includes a quick torso study for context and posture, as well as what I imagine to be a mass of matted, dirty hair. A timelapse of the sculpting process coming soon.

Homo Naledi portrait study, v1